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My United States Currency Collection Series 1896 Five Dollar Silver Certificate ('Educational') The Series 1896 Five Dollar Silver Certificate is the third note of the famous Educational Series of 1896 -- considered the most artistically designed of all U.S. Currency issues -- and reflects a time in American history when currency was not just money but also a work of art. The obverse of this large-size (7 3/8 by 3 1/8 inches) note is an engraving entitled 'Electricity as the Dominant Force in the World.' The obligation clause on the obverse reads, 'THIS CERTIFIES THAT THERE HAS BEEN DEPOSITED IN THE TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES FIVE SILVER DOLLARS PAYABLE TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND.' The reverse features portraits of both Robert Fulton and Samuel Morris and has a redemption clause that reads, 'THIS CERTIFICATE IS REDEEMABLE FOR CUSTOMS, TAXES AND ALL PUBLIC DUES, AND WHEN SO RECEIVED MAY BE REISSUED.'

How Much Are Old Five Dollar Bills Worth? First let’s get the biggest misconception out of the way. The idea that the older a five dollar bill is the more valuable. Sep 17, 2013. Ordinary low denomination bills are raking in thousands of dollars in an online trend that is centred on the eight-digit serial number which appears on each U.S. Mark up: A $1 bill with the serial number F00000001 C would be worth thousands of dollars. Little red, rooster, 4 years ago.

Series 1899 Five Dollar Silver Certificate ('Indian Chief') The large size Series 1899 $5 silver certificate is one of the more iconic five dollar bills. It measures 7 3/8 by 3 1/8 inches and bears the distinctive blue seal and serial numbers that mark it as a genuine Silver Certificate. The obverse features a portrait of a Ta-to-ka-in-yan-ka (also known as 'Running Antelope'), a member of the Oncpapa tribe of the Sioux Indians.

Red Serial Number Bills

This is the only issue of U.S. Paper money for which a Native American was selected as the central figure. The obverse also bears the phrases 'SILVER CERTIFICATE', 'THIS CERTIFIES THAT THERE HAVE BEEN DEPOSITED IN THE TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Five Silver Dollars Payable to the Bearer on demand. Washington, D.C.' The reverse of the note bears a redemption clause that states, 'THIS CERTIFICATE IS RECEIVABLE FOR CUSTOMS, TAXES AND ALL PUBLIC DUES, AND WHEN SO RECEIVED MAY BE REISSUED.' Series 1907 Five Dollar United States Note ('Wood Chopper') Large Size United States Notes were a 'national currency (as opposed to Federal Reserve Notes) and were created as fiat currency, meaning that they represented a 'bill of credit' and were inserted by the Treasury directly into circulation free of interest, with no guarantee that they could be be redeemed for precious metal. Issued in the large size of 7-3/8 by 3-1/8 inches (about 50 percent larger than today’s paper currency), the design of the Series 1907 $5 United States Note reflects a time in American history when currency was not just money but also a work of art.

The obverse features the 7th US President, Andrew Jackson, along with an engraving of a painting entitled 'The Pioneer Family' (which gives the note its nickname of 'The Wood Chopper'. Also included on the obverse are the phrases 'UNITED STATES NOTE', 'LEGAL TENDER FOR FIVE DOLLARS', 'THE UNITED STATES WILL PAY THE BEARER FIVE DOLLARS WASHINGTON, D.C.' , 'ACT OF MARCH 3rd, 1863' and 'ENGRAVED AND PRINTED AT THE BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING.' The reverse of the note features an abstract design and bears the text, 'United States of America,' as well as a redemption clause that states, 'THIS NOTE IS A LEGAL TENDER AT ITS FACE VALUE FOR ALL DEBTS PUBLIC AND PRIVATE, except Duties on Imports and Interest ON THE PUBLIC DEBT.' Also displayed on the back is a rather ominous warning about counterfeiting that reads, 'COUNTERFEITING OR ALTERING this Note or passing any Counterfeit or Alteration of it, or having in possession any false or counterfeit plate or impression of it, or any paper made in imitation of the Paper on which it is printed is a Felony, and is punishable by Five Thousand ($5,000) Dollars FINE, or Fifteen (15) years imprisonment at Hard Labor or both.'

One final oddity of this note is the phrase 'BUREAU OF ENGRAVING & PRINTING WASHINGTON, D. Entertainment Rigging By Harry Donovan Pdf Files. C.' Found at the corners of the reverse and the fact that 'SERIES 1907' is contained within an otherwise blank circular space. Series 1914 Five Dollar Federal Reserve Note (Red Seal) Large Size Federal Reserve Notes were printed from 1878 to 1923 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency and were initially redeemable in the same face value of silver dollar coins, and later in raw silver bullion.

Issued in the large size of 7-3/8 by 3-1/8 inches (about 50 percent larger than today’s paper currency), the design of the Series 1914 $10 Federal Reserve Note reflects a time in American history when currency was not just money but also a work of art. The obverse of the Series 1914 $5 Federal Reserve Note features the 16th US President, Abraham Lincoln. The first of these Series 1914 notes had distinctive red Treasury seals at the right (later notes in the same Series had blue seals, as described below) as well as a black seal on the left bearing both the district number (1-12) and the district letter (A-L) of the Federal Reserve Bank of issuance. This regional seal is a design facet unique to Federal Reserve Notes, because almost all other types of notes were issued directly by the U.S. The obverse also bears the phrases, 'FEDERAL RESERVE NOTE', 'AUTHORIZED BY FEDERAL RESERVE ACT OF DECEMBER 23, 1913' and 'THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA WILL PAY TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND FIVE DOLLARS.' Note that, while all Series 1914 $5 Federal Reserve Notes were printed in Washington DC, they were issued for all twelve Federal Reserve districts (Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Richmond, Atlanta, Chicago, St.

Louis, Minneapolis, Kansas City, Dallas, and San Francisco). The black seal on this particular note indicates that it was issued for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, New York. The left side of the reverse features a scene from the painting “Columbus's Discovery of Land” by Charles Schussele showing Columbus and members of his crew aboard the flagship Santa Maria as they approached the New World for the first time in October 1492. The right side of the reverse features a scene from the painting 'The Landing of the Pilgrims' by an unknown artist showing the Pilgrims landing ashore when they arrived from England in 1661. The reverse also bears a rather lengthy redemption clause that states, 'THIS NOTE IS RECEIVABLE BY ALL NATIONAL AND MEMBER BANKS AND FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS AND FOR ALL TAXES, CUSTOMS AND OTHER PUBLIC DUES. IT IS REDEEMABLE IN GOLD ON DEMAND AT THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT OF THE UNITED STATES IN THE CITY OF WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA OR IN GOLD OR LAWFUL MONEY AT ANY FEDERAL RESERVE BANK.'

Series 1914 Five Dollar Federal Reserve Note (Blue Seal) The Blue Seal Series 1914 Federal Reserve Notes are identical in design to the previously issued Red Seal versions (described above), except that the Treasury seal on the obverse is blue instead of red. Series 1923 Five Dollar Silver Certificate ('Porthole') The large size Series 1923 $5 silver certificate is one of the rarest and most sought-after five dollar bills of the 20th century and is nickenamed the 'Porthole' note. It measures 7 3/8 by 3 1/8 inches and bears the distinctive blue seal and serial numbers that mark it as a genuine Silver Certificate. The obverse features a portrait of the 16th US President, Abraham Lincoln, in a distinctive frame that gives this note its nickname. The obverse also bears the phrases 'SILVER CERTIFICATE', 'THIS CERTIFIES THAT THERE HAVE BEEN DEPOSITED IN THE TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Five Silver Dollars Payable to the Bearer on demand', 'THIS CERTIFICATE IS RECEIVABLEFOR ALL PUBLIC DUES AND WHEN SO RECEIVED MAY BE REISSUED' and 'Washington, D.C.'

The reverse of the note features the Great Seal of the united States with a radiating starburst sort of pattern. Series 1928F 'Red Seal' Five Dollar Legal Tender Note Legal Tender Notes, also known as United States Notes, were introduced during the Civil War. The size was reduced to modern standards beginning with Series 1928. The obverse of the small-size $5 Legal Tender Note features a central portrait of Abraham Lincoln and bears bears the distinctive red seal and serial numbers unique to Legal Tender Notes. The obligation clause on the obverse reads, 'THIS NOTE IS A LEGAL TENDER AT ITS FACE VALUE FOR ALL DEBTS OUBLIC AND PRIVATE.' Also on the obverse are the phrases, 'UNITED STATES NOTE' and 'THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA WILL PAY TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND FIVE DOLLARS.'

The reverse depicts the Lincoln Memorial. Series 1928 Five Dollar Federal Reserve Note The Series 1928 $5 Federal Reserve Note was the first to feature a green Treasury seal. These notes also carried a black seal on the left bearing the identity of the Federal Reserve Bank of issuance (the regional seal is a design facet unique to Federal Reserve Notes, because almost all other types of notes were issued directly by the U.S. Since the issuance of these notes predated the Gold Reserve Act of 1933, the obligation clause on the obverse reads, 'REDEEMABLE IN GOLD ON DEMAND AT THE UNITED STATES TREASURY, OR IN GOLD OR LAWFUL MONEY AT ANY FEDERAL RESERVE BANK.' The redemption clause reads, 'THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA WILL PAY TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND FIVE DOLLARS.'

The reverse depicts the Lincoln Memoria Note that, unlike previous Federal Reserve Notes that used both the district number and district letter to represent the specific bank of issuance, the Series 1928 and 1928A versions of this note used just the distict number (1-12) to represent the specific bank of issuance. Later series (1928B-1928D) used the district letter (A-L) instead. Series 1929 Five Dollar National Bank Note (Boston, Massachusetts) Series 1929 $5 National Currency Notes have a distinctive brown seal and were issued in two different varieties. The first type (which are properly called 'National Bank Notes') were issued by individual local banks from every state. The second type (which are more properly known as 'Federal Reserve Bank Notes') were issued by all twelve Federal Reserve districts. This particular note is a National Bank Note issued by the First National Bank of Boston, Massachusetts. The obverse bears the legend, 'NATIONAL CURRENCY SECURED BY UNITED STATES BONDS DEPOSITED WITH THE TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA' and a redemption clause that reads, 'REDEEMABLE IN LAWFUL MONEY OF THE UNITED STATES, AT UNITED STATES TREASURY OR AT THE BANK OF ISSUE.'

The obligation clause reads, 'THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS WILL PAY TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND FIVE DOLLARS.' Series 1929 Five Dollar Federal Reserve Bank Note (Boston, Massachusetts) Series 1929 $5 National Currency Notes have a distinctive brown seal and were issued in two different varieties. The first type (which are properly called 'National Bank Notes') were issued by individual local banks from every state.

The second type (which are more properly known as 'Federal Reserve Bank Notes') were issued by all twelve Federal Reserve districts (Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Richmond, Atlanta, Chicago, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Kansas City, Dallas, and San Francisco).

This particular note is a Federal Reserve Bank Note issued by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Massachusetts. The obverse bears the legend, 'NATIONAL CURRENCY SECURED BY UNITED STATES BONDS DEPOSITED WITH THE TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA OR BY LIKE DEPOSIT OF OTHER SECURITIES' and a redemption clause that reads, 'REDEEMABLE IN LAWFUL MONEY OF THE UNITED STATES, AT UNITED STATES TREASURY OR AT THE BANK OF ISSUE.' The obligation clause reads, 'THE FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS WILL PAY TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND FIVE DOLLARS.'

Series 1934A Five Dollar Federal Reserve Note The Series 1934 $5 Federal Reserve Note was largely unchanged from the previous series. Download Replmon Exe For Server 2008. The most important change was the removal of the word 'gold' from the obligation clause on the obverse, which now read, 'THIS NOTE IS LEGAL TENDER FOR ALL DEBTS, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE, AND IS REDEEMABLE IN LAWFUL MONEY AT THE UNITED STATES TREASURY, OR AT ANY FEDERAL RESERVE BANK.' Note also the lighter color of the green seal. Series 1934F Five Dollar Silver Certificate Small-size $5 Silver Certificates were issued with series dates of 1934 and 1953.

Once redeemable for silver coin or bullion, these notes and the redemption option were discontinued by Act of Congress in 1963. These small-size silver certificates bear distinctive blue Treasury seals and serial numbers and bear a simple obligation clause that states, 'THIS CERTIFICATE IS LEGAL TENDER FOR ALL DEBTS PUBLIC AND PRIVATE.' Also on the obverse is the phrase, 'THIS CERTIFIES THAT THERE IS ON DEPOSIT IN THE TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FIVE DOLLARS IN SILVER PAYABLE TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND.' Series 1934A WWII North Africa Five Dollar Emergency Note This special 1934A $5 Silver Certificate was printed for use during Operation Torch (the British–American invasion of French North Africa in World War II during the North African Campaign, starting on 8 November 1942). Unlike the standard silver certificates that bear a distinctive blue Treasury seal, these notes have a special yellow Treasury seal to assure instant recognition (and devaluation) in the event of defeats by the enemy, or enemy capture of large quantities of cash. These are also known as 'yellow seal' Silver Certificates. Series 1934 WWII Hawaii Five Dollar Emergency Note This special 1935 $5 Federal Reserve Note was printed for use in Hawaii after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Unlike the standard Federal Reserve Notes that bear a distinctive green Treasury seal, these notes have a special brown Treasury seal to assure instant recognition (and devaluation) in the event of defeats by the enemy, or enemy capture of large quantities of cash. In addition, the word 'HAWAII' is overprinted on the obverse and reverse. The obligation clause on the obverse reads, 'THIS NOTE IS LEGAL TENDER FOR ALL DEBTS, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE, AND IS REDEEMABLE IN LAWFUL MONEY AT THE UNITED STATES TREASURY OR AT ANY FEDERAL RESERVE BANK.' Series 1950A Five Dollar Federal Reserve Note The Series 1950 $5 Federal Reserve Note is very similar to the 1934 version, except that the green Treasury seal on the right is a little darker and smaller, the words 'WASHINGTON, D.C.' Now appear above the seal instead of below it, and the font of the obligation clause has been shrunk to fit on three lines instead of four. The obligation clause reads, 'THIS NOTE IS LEGAL TENDER FOR ALL DEBTS, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE, AND IS REDEEMABLE IN LAWFUL MONEY AT THE UNITED STATES TREASURY, OR AT ANY FEDERAL RESERVE BANK.' The redemption clause on the obverse states, 'THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA WILL PAY TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND FIVE DOLLARS.'

Series 1953A Five Dollar Silver Certificate The design of the $5 Silver Certificate was redesigned slightly in 1953. It still featured a central portrait of Abraham Lincoln on the obverse with the Lincoln Memorial on the reverse, but the size and location of various elements on the obverse were changed.

Series 1953B 'Red Seal' Five Dollar Legal Tender Note The Series 1953B Five Dollar note bears the distinctive red seal and serial numbers unique to Legal Tender Notes. The obligation clause on the obverse reads, 'THIS NOTE IS A LEGAL TENDER AT ITS FACE VALUE FOR ALL DEBTS PUBLIC AND PRIVATE' and the redemption clause reads, 'THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA WILL PAY TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND FIVE DOLLARS.' Series 1963 'Red Seal' Five Dollar Legal Tender Note (Star) The Series 1963 Five Dollar note is very similar in appearance to the 1953 note, except that the obligation clause has been shortened to read, 'THIS NOTE IS LEGAL TENDER FOR ALL DEBTS PUBLIC AND PRIVATE' and the redemption clause has been completely removed to indicate the fact that U.S.

Currency was now considered fiat money, unbacked by any physical asset. Also, the words 'IN GOD WE TRUST' have been added to the reverse. This particular example is special because it has a star in its serial number, indicating that it is a 'replacement note' issued in place of one that was damaged during the printing process in order to keep numbers sequential.

Series 1963A Five Dollar Federal Reserve Note The Series 1963 $5 Federal Reserve Note is very similar to the 1950 version, except that obligation clause on the obverse simply reads, 'THIS NOTE IS LEGAL TENDER FOR ALL DEBTS, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE' and the redemption clause has been removed completely to indicate the fact that U.S. Currency was now considered fiat money, unbacked by any physical asset. Also, the words 'IN GOD WE TRUST' have been added to the reverse. .