Can You Feel The Love Tonight Pdf String Quartet Music

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Tigran Hamasyan - Markos and Markos A transcription of a piece from one of my favorite pianists! Some of the rhythmic feels are hard to convey with notation and hard to analyze. Tigran mostly plays around with switching between swung 8s, straight 8s,16ths, and quintuplet swing. The transcription pertains to this 'original' recording: Tigran Hamasyan's 'Markos and Markos,' from his 2017 album, An Ancient Observer. Enjoy and let me know if you have any questions/feedback.

Can You Feel The Love Tonight Pdf String Quartet Music

STRING QUARTET SHEET MUSIC A string quartet is a musical ensemble of four string players – usually two violin players, a violist and a cellist – or a piece written to be performed by such a group. The string quartet is one of the most prominent chamber ensembles in classical music, with most major composers, from the.

Upon request by Savva Terentyev the transcription has been temporarily removed!!! This post contains the following attachment types: -youtube. 'Sleeping Giant' by Herbie Hancock Here's a lead sheet for Herbie Hancock's 'Sleeping Giant'. The sample percussion pattern at the beginning is not transcribed from the actual recording, but proposed as a sample Afro 12/8 pattern. The metric feel of the piece is somewhat ambiguous; in some places I've written the 12/8 meter as 6/4, which are mathematically equal, although phrased differently. How do you guys break this down?

Best, Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Believe You Me' by John Abercrombie Here's a lead sheet for John Abercrombie's 'Believe You Me', which is recorded on his ECM album 'Night'. The accompanying organ figure at letter B (AbMaj7#11 ->Bb6) is just my own interpretation derived from the comp figure at letter A (and intro).

Can You Feel The Love Tonight Pdf String Quartet Music

In my opinion the 2nd chord (DbMaj7#9#11) at letter C has a F harmonic minor flavor. How do you guys perceive this chord? Please share your thoughts. Best, Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Fun' by Miles Davis Miles Davis originally recorded this piece on January 11, 1968, and it wasn't released until 1981 as a part of compilation album 'Directions'.

The tune is also recorded by Joe Chambers on his 1992 release 'Phantom of the City'. I didn't include any chord symbols here, but added sample chord voicings for a reference. (Herbie Hancock plays an electric harpsichord on the recording!) The given bass line is doubled by a guitar, and it continues for solos (with slight variation). Solos are based on the key of D major. Best, Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf.

'Furs on Ice' by Marc Johnson This was rather demanding one to write down. I don't know if the given chords are dead-on, so all suggestions are appreciated. I listened to a few recordings of the piece (John Abercrombie's 'Getting There' and 'John Abercrombie / Marc Johnson / Peter Erskine', plus an instructional drum video by Peter Erskine available at which differed somewhat.

The trio recordings don't have the tenor sax part, but abide by the rhythm section motives. Best, Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic Brief piano transcription (or maybe gist version) of Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic for my niece - from the Ghost in the Machine by The Police. Always liked this tune, but Sting apparently brought it to the band pretty fully formed with a bunch of piano tracks. Copeland reportedly recorded the Police version drum track in one take, and Summers added a few distinctive guitar parts (including one that I bet you never caught in the mix, see multitrack files below) completing its conversion to a more Police-sounding tune. I guess that was all hinted at by the mixer 'fight scene' in the original music video.

(on the recording, tuning is A = 450 Hz) This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Au Lait' by Metheny & Mays Hi there! I have transcribed Pat Metheny's and Lyle Mays' tune 'Au Lait' from the Group's 'Offramp' recording. The piece is not included in the PM Songbook since Pat felt that Lyle's contribution to the composition was more significant than his. The tune has an ethereal swaying feel and it changes time signatures frequently.

Also, the tonalities wander throughout the piece. Now, I'd like to hear if anyone of you guys out there has ever performed this composition, or have figured out the solo changes for the song. All comments are welcome.:) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf -application/pdf. Kurt Rosenwinkel - Brooklyn Sometimes Hey folks. I've done a lead sheet for Kurt Rosenwinkel's great tune Brooklyn Sometimes, from his latest Deep Song album. I know he's released a book of tune transcriptions, I personally haven't seen it, this chart was done as more of an exercise for me.

It is a great tune, nonetheless. Bouncing along with a kind of wistful ease and swagger, it's upbeat but gentile, and as Rosenwinkel has mentioned of many of his tunes, it is very songlike. I've done a pretty long analysis, and any corrections would be useful! Analysis: The first 16 bars are piano introduction, the same chords as the repeated section at the sign. I think on the recording Kurt plays the piano here, so his singing is a part of the tone colour of the introduction. The vocal line is very quiet, and difficult to discern, but is there, and elegantly sows some of the seeds of the melody within the harmony by embelleshing the melodic tones.

The vocal line also adds a certain specialness to some parts here: note in bar 10 how the vocal line doubles the bottom rising figure, which is quieter from the piano, and does not double the higher figure. Rosenwinkel said that sometimes some harmonies need a richness added to certain tones, and he will try and add this richness through his singing. I'm sure Kurt could have sung that top line, but he chose to sing the rising one, adding a shimmering rising texture to the major sixth, which falls to a perfect fifth, which lifts the figure. The rising figure makes the lift more subtle, which the top, higher line being the lit one, the one that is noticed. The embellesment of the rising figure makes a point of highlighting the slip from the slightly more dissonant sixth to the more consonant fifth, rather than a mere fall from the D# to D natural.

The chords themselves appear beautifully chosen and structured when the melody appears in bar 17. I've written chord symbols, most probably to aid in improvisation over the section, or to make the harmony understandable. However the voicings should be strictly adheared to. They are necessary for the tune to make sense, in my mind, and are great, simple chords. The repeated section itself is split into two further subsections, made clear by the bassline.

In the first 4 bars the harmony moves up, and then twice down, and in the second four bars performs a similar outing except for the B major(add4) in bar 24. The cadence here falls to the Asus in bar 25. Really this is an E chord, but the Asus makes for more clarity of voicing than E7(omit3)/A, and really the Asus is a true Asus performing the function of the E chord. This second subsection would appear to be a dominant section, but is not quite what it seems. Instead of having a section of movement around the dominant, the bassline conceals the key centre by hovering on the B and F#.

This makes for an intruiging mix of ambiguous tonality - the first subsection is very clearly a D minor sound, but here, it is difficult to work out exactly what is going on. Moments like bar 28, with a Eb major sounding chord, superimposed over this B natural make for a jolt in tonality. The lower Bb of the voicing clashes with the B natural in the bass. But it isn't really dissonant, it is merely the harmonic extension of the perpendicular nature of the melody and the bassline at this point. The section shuffles along, with the bassline being altered in bar 30 to make the sound more consonant, to finally find the dominant in bar 32 (albeit with a b9, which adds to the slightly more dissonant nature of this section).

Then follows a bridge section. This section is intruiging, not only harmonically, but rhythmically also. Firstly we have the A / Gm / D/F# figure which is then lowered and continued in the E / F/Eb / D figure. But there, apparently, the logic seems to end. Even the melody is disjointed, although still songlike. It is not nearly as memorable as the melody in the sign section.

Mehldau approaches the piano melody with great touch but also robustness, which allows for the melody and Kurt's interjections to coexist carefully and not compete. After the piano plays its melody, the guitar returns with a strange, haunting melody over some even more illogical changes, and a strange rhythmical structuring.

I've written it in 4, but it could easily be split up into other time signatures. Ali Jackson supports the bassline by adding cymbal sounds and crashes, but also continues with the double-time feel with the hihat on upbeat quavers. Really, to me, the purpose of this bridge section is to contrast the logical nature of the sign melody, so when it returns on the D.S.

There is a release of tension and rhythmic uncertainty - suddenly, there it is, that incessant bassline, the upbeat quavers, bouncing along. The bridge changes return for a piano solo, only before a guitar solo on rising chromatic harmony. At bar 51 I've written the changes extremely simply - some of the voicings should be more minor, some should be more major in sound.

But really the voicings are up to the pianist. The bass shows where the harmony is going, and the resolution at bars 57-8 allows a little breath of fresh air. The rising chromatic harmony builds tension incredibly, and this is greatly contrasted by the release of tension as the piano solo enters. Finally, the melody at the sign is recapitulated, to fine on the dominant A7(b9), which lingers in midair. Despite this, the tune is extremely satisfying - it doesn't end on the bridge.

The great melody comes back, and the listener goes off humming it. Hope this has helped shed some light on a great Rosenwinkel tune. This post contains the following attachment types: -application/x-sibelius-score. 'Pinocchio' by Wayne Shorter Weather Report's (Mr. Gone, 1978) take on Wayne Shorter's 'Pinocchio' differs from the earlier version on Miles Davis' Nefertiti (1968). Weather Report's version doesn't include any solos, except for the fade-in improvisation before the repeated melody choruses.

Also, the Weather Report's recording has two extra measures of B13#11 at the end of the head. Miles' take is 18 measures in length, and Weather Report's two measures longer. Jaco doubles much of the melody on his bass.

The melody is played to a degree in unison, so the given chord changes actually refer to the original version. Best, Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Paraphernalia' by Wayne Shorter Hey there! I need your help with this one. I haven't came upon any sheet music to this piece. This sketch is based on the 'Miles In The Sky' version.

The other recordings appear metrically much loose. The short phrases, which work as cues for the performers, are played in desired length on the walking bass line. The tag in 3/4 time is played at the end of each chorus. All suggestions are much appreciated. Best, Ville [Transcription revised on June 18, 2015] This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf.

'Dance Me Home' by John Scofield Hey there! Here's an incomplete lead sheet to John Scofield's 'Dance Me Home' from his 1988 release 'Loud Jazz' on Gramavision Records. The chart has the basic sections, but lacks some further developed passages. I need your help to review the chart and make the necessary corrections.

All comments are welcome. Best, Ville P.S. Seamus Blake recorded the tune in a straight-ahead jazz vein on his 'Bellwether' and 'Live in Italy'. This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Gretchen Parlato's How We Love Hi all, I've been transcribing How We Love from Gretchen Parlato's The Lost & Found. I think I've got it mostly done, but am skeptical of my results for one particular measure.

Can anyone take a look and let me know what's going on there, harmonically? In return, feel free to the transcription. It's measure 23 in the attached PDF, the one with the half-note triplet. In the recording, it's at 1:03. This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf.

'Undecided' (piano only) as performed by Erroll A transcription of the piano on the hot track 'Undecided' off of Erroll Garner's album 'No Ballad (1945-1949)' The main goal of the transcription was to try to pick out the voicings in the right hand (block chord) passages both as a transcription exercise and an effort to more deeply understand the style and approach of this great pianist! Please enjoy and feel free to share and make any comments or critiscims. Also thanks to Michael McAndrew for his help with this transcrition. This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf -audio/mp3. Two Pieces by Bennie Maupin Hello there!

Here are two compositions by Bennie Maupin. The first is from his album 'Slow Traffic to the Right' (1977). Herbie Hancock recorded the tune earlier on his album 'Crossings' (1972). Herbie's take on harmony differs from Bennie's arrangement a great deal. The second one is transcribed from Bennie's recording 'Early Reflections' (2008). The melody is played by bass clarinet and acoustic bass in unison.

Best, Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. (Request) Not Forgetting - Bill Connors via Gary Peacock, I used to have a lead sheet of the ballad 'Not Forgetting' (recorded on Bill Connors 1977 'Of Mist And Melting' session with Jan Garbarek, Gary Peacock, and Jack DeJohnette, that also had a lovely take of Bill Connors 'Melting' [aka 'Spanish Flames'] on it.), but the old photocopy Gary gave me back in 1977 is now so totally faded as to be completely unreadable. Anyone here happen to have a lead sheet or transcription of 'Not Forgetting'?

(Request) Im Wald [In The Woods] by Fritz Pauer I'm seeking the lead sheet to: Im Wald [In The Woods] by the late Fritz Pauer I'd talked to Fritz about getting a copy of the lead sheet of this jazz ballad from him, a couple years before his death - He said it (along with quite a number of lead sheets of his compositions over the years) was in his basement, and that he'd try to find it. When I heard about his death, I inquired about his lead sheets and scores, and was informed by his publisher that most of his lead sheets and scores had already been sold en masse by his wife.

However, maybe someone here will come across someone who has Fritz Pauer's lead sheets and scores from performing with him, or from other sources. Transcription Request: 'Nomad' This is off Grant Green's 1963 album, 'Idle Moments,' and is one of my favorites off the album.

Has two sections, one contains a complex melody that leads into the second, a very swinging Dorian pedal point that shifts a whole step down. Joe Henderson blows over this tune, which makes sense, he was a fan of Dorian interpreted whole steps apart, i.e. Black Narcissus. A transcription for this would be really useful for me as well as the jazz community, this is a tough one to do by ear. Thank you This post contains the following attachment types: -youtube. 'Ahmad the Terrible' by Jack DeJohnette This is a transcription of the head of the piece 'Ahmad the Terrible' by Jack DeJohnette, which appears on the 1984 album 'Album Album' by DeJohnette's Special Edition group.

The piece has a 56-bar form, and the head is played twice before the solos and roughly one and a half times after the solos (the recording ends on the C chord at the beginning of the C-pedal section at bar 21, and this last time the chord is played as a C7). Except for this C-pedal section, the head is played without a consistent tempo, instead quickly accelerating and decelerating; during solos, however, the tempo is consistent throughout the form. The melody is mostly built on simple major chord arpeggios separated by a whole step, and in bars 11-16, more complex chords are built by playing major chords over a major chord root a whole step below. The piece achieves a circular effect, in that bars 53-56 (at the end of the form) follow the arpeggio pattern of the first 6 bars. This post contains the following attachment types: -image/jpeg. 'The Prophet' by Eric Dolphy This is a transcription of the head of the 32-bar piece 'The Prophet' by Eric Dolphy, which appears on the 1961 live album 'At the Five Spot' by Dolphy and Booker Little.

The head is played as a slow shuffle, while the solos are played over the same chords but in a double-time swing fashion. For a Dolphy tune, the chord changes are fairly logical and tonal, and the melody is quite lyrical despite some characteristically large interval leaps. The form is AABA, with the A sections ending decisively in Bb major and the B section (with no written melody) consisting of 8 different ii-V progressions beginning in the key of G and moving away by a tritone and then down a semitone until this pattern repeats, moving to the keys of Db, C, Gb, F, B, Bb, and E. While Dolphy sustains the long Eb note in the melody on alto saxophone, Little usually moves down a semitone to D on his trumpet, forming a dissonant minor second interval between the two horns.

This post contains the following attachment types: -image/jpeg. Piano Solo Transcription A transcription of the piano solo in Naima from John Coltrane's album Giant Steps. Wynton Kelly was pianist on this cut; Tommy Flanagan was pianist on all the other cuts.

Kelly died in 1971, age 39. In 2011 I and several colleagues at the school where I teach decided to perform Naima for the student body, so I, being a really poor improviser, decided I would transcribe Kelly's solo for our performance. Because of all the really tight harmonies in the solo, it took me two weeks to complete the transcription, but I am pretty sure it is very accurate. This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf -youtube.

'Joy Ryder' by Wayne Shorter This is a transcription of the head of the piece 'Joy Ryder' by Wayne Shorter. I transcribed this while listening to the version of the tune which appears on Shorter's 1988 album of the same name, mainly because it is a clear studio recording and it is played relatively slowly. Despite this, I do prefer the more recent, fast, and loose live versions which Shorter has played with his 'Footprints Quartet.' Besides the simple tonic-to-dominant harmonic vamp in A minor over which solos are played on the 1988 version, the majority of the head lacks many clearly discernible chords, and I have only notated the chords of which I am fairly certain. Instead of using chords, the interest in this head mainly lies in the dissonant (I am almost tempted to say atonal), rhythmically-complex melodic counterpoint between Shorter's saxophone part and the bass part.

This post contains the following attachment types: -image/jpeg. Bill Evans - Minority (piano head and solo) Posted is a transcription of the introduction, head and bill evan's solo on Minority [Album: Everybody Digs Bill Evan's Year: 1958] here is the recording: The solo transcription was done mostly as an exercise in melodic diction so I have not concerned to a great extent rhythmic accuracy. There are some points in which the playing was 'rhythmically free' most likely on purpose. The transcription of the head was done as an exercise in hearing harmony and voicings. I only transcribed the first chorus.

Notice that the F tonality (the I chord) is sometimes major sometimes minor. In the head the listener experiences both major and minor tonalities. Making the minor tonality sort of like a suspension or and accented set of neighbor tones if you will. Anyways, i hope you enjoy and any feedback/criticism will be gladly accepted. This is likely my last bill evans post but i think i will be moving on to some other pianists perhaps in a solo setting as opposed to a trio. This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Bill evan's gloria's step Posted is both a transcription of the head and bill evan's solo on gloria step (take 2) [Album: Sunday At The Village Vanguard Year: 1961 Label: Riverside] The solo transcription was done mostly as an exercise in melodic diction so I have not concerned to a great extent rhythmic accuracy.

The transcription of the head was done as an exercise in hearing harmony and voicings. I only transcribed the first A and B section nothing more. The naming of Emaj7b5 is perhaps inappropriate although it was difficult to find a suitable functional chord symbol for this harmony. Perhaps Calt is more appropriate as the harmony is a C altered scale.

However it is often that the bass implies E major tonality. Anyways, i hope you enjoy and any feedback/criticism will be gladly accepted. This post contains the following attachment types: -youtube -application/pdf -application/pdf -application/pdf.

Further study on 'Chameleon' I sat down and tried to figure out what's happening on Herbie's Chameleon (Head Hunters, 1974). I wrote down the overall structure, bass lines, basic chord changes and changing meters, and here's what I've managed to put together.

Don't take the chords at letter H for granted - they are rather a sum of evaluation of some charts I've checked. Note that the tempo accelerates gradually towards the end. Best wishes from Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Help with 'Beija-Flor' I came across this beautiful bossa nova piece on Jim Hall's 'All Across the City'. I scribbled down a rough transcription of the song. However, I'm unsure of the chord progression of the A section and thus need to consult you out there. The letter A has a few suspended 4ths that resolve to 3rds, and some augmented 5ths that resolve down a half step (e.g.

At bar 4 of A: F/A ->Am), which I've left aside from the chord progression. I'm particularly uncertain about the F#m7b5 (or Am6) at bar 12 of letter A. Does anyone have a sheet music to this wonderful piece?

Here's Jim Hall's treatment of the composition (in A minor) along with Brazilian MPB-4 group's sung version (in C minor): 1) 2) All help is much appreciated! 'Greenstreet' by John Abercrombie This piece is transcribed from John Abercrombie's most recent ECM release titled '39 Steps'. On the recording the piece is performed in broken time feel, giving the music a lighter, more open flow.

I also listened to Abercrombie's solo guitar treatment of the tune at, which gave me a new perspective to the composition. All comments and suggestions are welcome! Best, Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf.

Blues on My Mind - Benny Golson Also found on Nouvelle Vague as 'Des Femmes Disparaissent.' Thanks to my friends on the Finale list for their engraving suggestions (and French title correction), particularly James Darcy Argue for his extensive and specific comments. This is the revised lead sheet. Any shortcomings are strictly my own! Thanks also to Jeff Helgesen, for hosting my transcription of Blue Mitchell's solo on this tune: This post contains the following attachment types: -youtube -application/pdf. 'In A Silent Way' by Miles Davis Here's a medley from Miles Davis' 'In A Silent Way' (1969, Columbia) in lead sheet notation.

The potpourri consists of three pieces: 1) 'Shhh/Peaceful', 2) 'In A Silent Way', and 3) 'It's About That Time'. The 2nd tune was repeated at the end of 3rd piece to conclude the set. This daring blend of rock and jazz shocked the mouldy jazz critics, but was later on rated among the finest in Miles' outputs of his career. The title track was originally written by Joe Zawinul, but Miles cut down the rather complex chord changes in order to make it more 'rock'; still, the rubato piece sounds more like a ballad. The sparse harmonies ring over the continuous E pedal that is played on a bowed bass. The other pieces - 'Shhh/Peaceful' and 'It's About That Time' - are played in a strict rock groove.

The first piece has only one chord (D7sus4) that is interpreted somewhat freely. The continuous bass figure has only two notes. The structure is wide open for lengthy solos.

The latter is more abstract harmonically and is composed of three sections that alternate in the course of solos.:) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Hello to the Wind' by Chambers & McDaniels Hello! I ran into this piece while listening to Bobby Hutcherson's album 'Now!' That's been out of print for a good while now. There are a handful of recorded versions of this piece, which differ a good deal from each other.

The four versions I've heard appear on the following albums: Bobby Hutcherson's 'Now!' (1969), Universal Jones' 'Universal Jones, Vol. 1' (1972), Woody Shaw´s 'Concert Ensemble at the Berliner Jazztage' (1976), and Joe Chamber's 'Double Exposure' (1977). On Hutcherson's 'Now!' The song is performed without the bass obbligato as shown at letter A. In fact, the bass obbligato resembles the opening bass figure of 'Pharaoh's Dance' (as performed on Miles' 'Bitches Brew'). My transcription is a mix of the recorded versions, and not necessarily correct in any way.

The lyrics go as follows: 'Hello to the wind, glad you blew my way. Hello lonely friend, have you come to stay? Cool breeze flow soft and slow. Hello to the morn, good to see you born. Sun to warm my face from its home in space. Moon is fading from sight, and bird to wake and then take flight, and rays of sun begin to show, and then I know. Just how little I know, and what I am learning of.

Hello to the sky, good to see you clear. Join the wind and I, glad to have you here. Cool breeze flow soft and slow. Hello to the night, hope your day was fine. Mine was very bright, your should be like mine. Sun has faded from my sight, and here's the moon to greet the night. Children scamper home at fright, and then I know.

Just how little I know, and what I am learning of.' Since English is not my native language there might be a number of blunders in the text, so please point them out. I need your help with the transcription. If anyone has a chart for this piece I would love to take a look at it. All comments are welcome. Best, Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf.

Decoy by Miles Davis This is the title number from Miles Davis' Decoy album (1985), which is rated as a flop of his latter career. The tune has a characteristic steady funk-rock groove with synthetic sounds and chromatic lines. The harmony is pretty loose here, including a good deal of chromatic movement and dissonance. I would suggest playing a Eb/A chord at letter A, and a Dm7(13) at B. Sonic Xg Full Version Download.

The piece has a rough and dynamic urban pulse. The slap bass is putting diminished 5ths in hard use.:) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Thanks to Ville; Thanks to Brian Price 8/11/11 Ville writes: 'Still, it's a pity people don't feel like to contribute to the discussion here, since I assume that there are a lot of expertise out there to be shared. Thus I'd like to encourage all you to come in on the discussion. This is a great forum for discussion and sharing our work. We have FJI (I take it's to Ed Byrne's credit) to thank for this opportunity.' Ville, FJI creator Brian Price's original purpose for FJI was to provide a platform for posting music examples to assist in the discussions taking place at the AAJ forum, so it is Brian we have to thank for this great forum (FJI).

For my part, I am no longer interested in the culture and style of AAJ, and I would welcome developing, along with you and Brian, more discussion at FJI. While I have been busy the past few years with my music, I would look forward to contributing again. It may be a bit redundant, Ville, but I very much admire your formidable contribution. Moreover, I believe that your transcriptions are a tremendous service to the entire world jazz community.

Best, Ed Byrne. Portia by Marcus Miller 'Portia' is recorded on Miles Davis' 'Tutu' (1986). The tune is characterized by Spanish-flavored Phrygian mode. Trumpet and soprano sax play melody by turns; the horn at rest plays fills behind the melody. Actually, the trumpet plays melody only the first time at letters A & B and plays fills through rest of the tune.

On recording, the last 4 bars of letter C are played twice on D.S., before moving on to letter D. Futhermore, does anyone have a lead sheet for 'Tomaas' (by Davis & Miller) from the same album?

Best, Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'To the Little Radio' by Hanns Eisler & Bertolt This is one of my favorite songs of all time. In spite of the 'Xmasy' feel of the song, it is actually a rather serious story about a Jewish man, who's fleeing from the Nazi persecution with his little radio.

The song is a part of larger work called the 'Hollywood Songbook' that was composed during Eisler's exile in the USA. Over 40 years later Sting rewrote the original lyrics (written by Bertolt Brecht), and performed the song on his '.Nothing Like the Sun' album. Even though the song isn't originally a jazz tune, some jazz groups (e.g. Marcin Wasilewski Trio) have made beautiful interpretations of it. Season's Greetings to All!

This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Yesternow' by Miles Davis This is the 2nd cut from 'A Tribute to Jack Johnson'.

'Yesternow' is a collage of different takes and lots of overdubbing. Each section is from different recording, which are combined as a whole by Teo Macero. The transcription lacks the final section that's composed of prerecorded wind ensemble passage and overdubbed trumpet solo. I have no idea where the rubato wind ensemble passage comes from. I guess, it's from Teo's personal archives. Does anyone have a chart for this final section?:) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Sanctuary by Wayne Shorter I found two Wayne Shorter's handwritten lead sheets of 'Sanctuary' in Victor Svorinich's (2009) dissertation entitled Listen to This: A Musical Analysis of Miles Davis's 'Bitches Brew'.

According to the original lead sheets the tune has no tempo marking, nor do they have bar lines that would illustrate a spesific time signature. The lack of defined rhythm and strict chord changes leaves plenty of room for the rhythm section to explore different textures more freely. This also leaves plenty of room for the soloist to explore the melody more freely. The original lead sheets differ slightly both in melodic and harmonic rhythm. I've added some sample voicings to the chart that also exist in Wayne's manuscript. On 'Bitches Brew' the head is preceded by Miles' interpretation of 'I Fall In Love Too Easily' (by Jule Styne & Sammy Cahn) in the key of E flat major. It's apparent that the piece evolved and changed on any given concert depending on the the mood of the group.

Happy New Year everyone! The chord symbols in parentheses do not exist in the original scores. This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Pharaoh's Dance by Joe Zawinul Here's a rather simplified presentation of Joe Zawinul's 'Pharaoh's Dance' as performed on Miles Davis' 'Bitches Brew'. The music on the album is very freely interpreted and based on a minimum of written instructions.

Miles never played someone else's tune the way they had written it - he always changed it. So is the case with Zawinul's 'Pharaoh's Dance' that was originally written in two parts. The recorded version executes Zawinul's loose plan for the piece (Zawinul notated part two with directions such as 'keep developing', 'play whenever', 'turn statement one in and out with your own free will', etc.) and omits certain parts. Much of the part one on the recording is loosely interpreted and constructed through a series of editing loops.:) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Request for 'What is there to say' I'm looking for a transcription of the Bill Evans version of this song on his Everybody Loves Bill Evans album.

I've been able to find a couple of fake book versions of the chord progressions, and a print version of the original song by Vernon Duke, plus a vocal one by Ella F., but nothing with the complete Bill Evans score. I even tried converting a mp3 to MIDI with AudioScore and then inputing it into Sibelius but the transfer to MIDI failed miserably. Thx much for any help. Jon Snider Colorado Springs.

Need help with 'Tomaas' Hey all! I tried to write down the melody and harmony of 'Tomaas' by Marcus Miller and Miles Davis. The chord changes are still unclear and I need to ask your help to clear them up. The funky guitar figure (which suggests a E7 harmony) continues in similar manner underneath the A, B and D sections. The piece consists of layers of motives, such as the rhythmic single (E) note figure at the beginning, which continues throughout the piece (with slight variation). The piece also involves overdubbing and synthesized instruments, such as the drums and the guitar(?). I'm not sure if any of the chord symbols are correct.

Please help me out! Best, Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Still Warm' by John Scofield Hey there! This is the title track from John Scofield's 'Still Warm' album (1986, Gramavision) that includes great writing and awesome grooves. The tune is harmonically very interesting, incorporating a good number of slash chords and inversions. The solo section is built on four chords (G13sus, AbMaj7#11/G, Absus/G and E/G) that are played over G pedal point. Scofield uses G mixolydian, Ab lydian, Ab major and G half-step/whole-step diminished scales on those chords.

The bass line (at letter A) is not an accurate transcription and is included for reference only. And once again, please feel free to share your thoughts on the transcription. Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Comments & corrections wanted Hi All Here is my latest attempt at learning to transcribe jazz tune heads.

This is the first 16 bars or so of Fletcher Henderson's 'Soft Winds' played by one of my favorites, Terell Stafford from his 'New Beginnings' cd. There was a transcription on the Jazz Trumpet Solo website by Mark Russo already done of his solo which I am attempting to learn, but I also wanted to play the head. It seems very simple, but I am a complete novice at transcribing so please, comment, correct & suggest. Thanks This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Riot' by Herbie Hancock This transcription of 'Riot' is based on the version played on Herbie Hancock's 'Speak Like A Child'. The tune is also recorded on Miles Davis' 'Nefertiti' with slightly altered structure.

The composition includes an unconventional EmMaj9 (add b6) chord, which implies E harmonic minor scale (1, ½, 1, 1, ½, 1½, ½). The bass creates a strong and active counter-melody - or more like the leading melody - to the chord at introduction and bars 10 - 13 of the melody chorus. The chords at bars 6 - 9 of head are a rather enlightened guess - the chromatic movement through the short progression sounds agreeable to me though. The solo section on the recording is harmonically more eventful.:) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Lonely Woman by Ornette Coleman This is another oddity - along with Miles' Bitches Brew - that was truly difficult to transcribe. It was merely a bold attempt to analyze the tune and therefore it's essential no to stick to the chart too literally but 'go with the flow'. The song has been covered by several jazz musicians (e.g.

Joshua Redman, Branford Marsalis and Joe Lovano) but I haven't seen the tune in any fake book around. Guess it's high time to fill in the gap. The rhythmic phrasing of alto sax in Coda is transcribed hastily and should be revised. Please share your thoughts on the chart - all suggestions are welcome! Best wishes from Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf.

'Plus Fort Que Nous' by Francis Lai Here's a dusky ballad from an old French film called 'Un Homme et Une Femme' (A Man and a Woman), whose soundtrack includes many memorable pieces. The album has this particular song both as vocal and instrumental versions. The sung version features a female (contralto) and a male (baritone) voices. The female voice covers the A section and the male voice takes charge at the B section. I'm unsure of the chords (Em7 A7) at bar 3 of letter B. Here's the original version of the song::) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Unrequited' by Brad Mehldau There are at least three recorded versions of this composition: 1) Mehldau's 'The Art of the Trio, Vol.

3: Songs', 2) Pat Metheny's and Mehldau's collaboration entitled 'Metheny/Mehldau', and 3) Mehldau's most recent 'Live in Marciac'. The melody - that moves in small intervals - is freely interpreted rhythmically and its interpretation varies between the recordings a good deal. My transcription is based on the 'Art of the Trio, Vol 3' trio cut and 'Metheny/Mehldau' duet recording. The pickup note (C) is omitted on the 'Trio' recording. The piece modulates through various minor keys, and never really resolves, creating a perception of perpetual motion. The piano utilizes a three-part counterpoint alongside the bass line, weaving a rhythmically and harmonically interesting texture.:) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf.

'Green Tea' by John Scofield This mellow bossa nova is from John Scofield's 'A Go Go'. The Wurlitzer riff at the beginning continues in similar manner throughout the head yet observing the chord changes. However, I'm not sure if the keyboard figure is correctly transcribed, so I need to consult all you keyboard players out there about the riff. The bass plays a conventional bossa nova line focusing on the root and fifth of the chords. Listen to the tune here: This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'In The Crease' by Branford Marsalis This is an incomplete transcription, for it lacks the solo section.

The pianist's right hand voicings are limited to three notes, but you may extend them at will. The bass figure, which is doubled by pianist's left hand, lays a strong and active counter line to the melody played by a tenor saxophone. The song form is as follows: Head (A1 - A2 - B - A3); Tenor solo (C); Piano solo (C); Head (A1 - A2); Drum solo (B); Out-head (A3). If there is anyone capable of writing down the solo section, I'd kindly ask for a copy of the transcription.

All comments are welcome. Best from Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Festive Minor by Gerry Mulligan This number is from Gerry Mulligan's 'What Is There to Say?' That was recorded in 1958 and 1959. The album can be considered a classic in modern jazz.

The quartet consists of baritone sax, trumpet, bass and drums (there isn't any chordal instrument on the recording). The album features fantastic interplay between the musicians (highly recommended!). The chart lacks a 32-bar section that is played before the out chorus. This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf.

Really, really, really old tunes. Hi guys, I'm looking for a couple of really ancient tunes. In fact I know they're in the Anderson Fake Book (I just don't have that kind of money). So, if you guys happen to have these tunes, or know where else I can find them, please help.

It would be greatly appreciated! Here's the list: *Big Lip Blues *Sweet Mumtaz *Waitin' For Katy *Yearning *New Orleans Bump *Call of the Freaks *Chant in the Night *Egyptian Fantasy *Blackstick *Les Oignons Thanks, -ndhjazz. 'Bitches Brew' fine-tuned Hi there! I listened to the tune over and over again, and made some changes to the earlier chart.

I guess this updated transcription gives a slightly better picture of the song. The piece is so abstract and harmonically free-floating, that I need further study to fully understand the nature of it. Chick Corea recalls that Miles showed him three triads to use on the tune: E major triad, Eb major triad and C major triad *. Those triads form an intresting scale (E, G, Ab, B, C, Eb), which doesn't have an established name; my proposal would be a Harmonic Major Scale (b6) with #2 (or #9 = minor 3rd) and omitted 4th.

Please share your thoughts on this topic.:) Ville * Chick Corea on the Miles Davis Story: This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Spanish Key' by Miles Davis Hi there!

Here's a lead sheet for Miles' 'Spanish Key' as performed on his 'Bitches Brew'. Miles employs so called 'coded phrases' in order to direct the band. Phrygian modes are applied here both on D7#9 and E7#9 chords. I guess that the word 'Spanish' in the title stems from the Phrygian mode, which has a strong Spanish flavor.

The four sections (letters A, B, C, D) are repeated over and over again in the following order: 1) Introduction; 2) A (main theme = phrase 1); 3) Phrase 2; 4) B (solo); 5) C (solo); 6) Phrase 3; 7) D (solo); 8) Phrase 3; 9) C (solo); 10) Phrase 3; 11) D (solo); 12) A (main theme) 13) Phrase 2; 14) B (solo); 15) C (solo); 16) Phrase 3; 17) D (solo); 18) A (main theme); 19) Phrase 2 (Miles plays the phrase and band ends on D7#9).:) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Filles de Kilimanjaro' by Miles Davis 'Filles de Kilimanjaro' is an intresting study on rhythm. The bass figure at first melody chorus suggests a 3/4 time, but shifts into 4/4 time for second melody chorus. Note that the bass line is not a detailed note-for-note transcription, but rather an overview of its rhythm. Since the drum pattern doesn't make a clear difference between the downbeats and upbeats, I used the bass figure as determination for time signature. Hal Message Wave File. The melodic rhythm (played by the horns) suggests a 4/4 time when starting it on the first beat.

The 2nd melody chorus, however, begins on the 2nd beat of the bass pattern. I guess, that the 4/4 bass figure in my chart should start on the 2nd beat instead, like shown in Ed's transcription (The bass figure descends a half step to F# at bars 31-37. However, on the 2nd chorus - which is played in 4/4 time - the bass figure holds in G throughout. Apparently the piece is in large part improvised - especially the rhythm section is toying with rhythms and harmonies. The varying rhythms seem to challenge the musicians, but they manage to hold the cheerful piece together to the end.

It can also be regarded as polyrhythmic tune, since there occur simultaneous independent rhythms.:) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Mademoiselle Mabry (Miss Mabry)' by Miles Davis This one is the last track off Miles Davis' 'Filles de Kilimanjaro'. The tune is parallel with Jimi Hendrix' 'The Wind Cries Mary' in the chromatic three-chord figure (e.g. At bar 5 and a variation at 1st bar). Electric piano and acoustic bass play their repetitive parts throughout while drums fill sparsely around the harmonic rhythm. After the 'melody' chorus (the melody is rather nonexistent here, since the head is constructed of chords and bass line) is played 3 times, the trumpet solo starts and lasts until it gives way to tenor solo.

After the tenor solo, the upper line (piano right hand) blends into a piano solo. In the end Miles re-enters for a brief solo to conclude the piece. Occasionally - approximately every other repeat - piano and bass play the first bar of the chorus like shown at the final bar (F triad, Eb triad, E triad, F triad). This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Bitches Brew by Miles Davis This is the title track from Miles' groundbreaking Bitches Brew album. The letter A is tricky to notate due to its freely interpreted approach.

Those quirky keyboard voicings are given merely as a point of reference, so don't stick to the chart too literally. The letter B is harmonically very loose, but it's played in strict funk groove. Focus on the tones rather than the actual tonalities and dive into the groove!:) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. 'Sanctuary' by Wayne Shorter I transcribed the head of Wayne Shorter's 'Sanctuary' as played by the Carlos Santana & Wayne Shorter Band in 1988 Montreux jazz Festival (The song was originally written as a slow waltz (3/4), but has been played in rubato and 4/4 time in his later executions (e.g.

'Bitches Brew', 'Circle in the Round' and 'Footprints live!' Also, I enclose a MIDI file of the head of the tune here. The file is thrown together rather hastily, but will give a picture of the above mentioned live version. The opening phrase in the MIDI file is played over D D9#11 A-11 , but I guess it would be more close to home as D D7b9#11 A-7b5(11) . All comments are welcome!:) Ville P.S.

My computer discovered a malware threat on the Free Jazz Intitute's site some time ago, but it didn't notice any harm this time. Any experiences on this discovery? This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf -audio/midi. Idle Moments by Grant Green 'Idle Moments, recorded over two sessions in November, 1963, and featuring Hutcherson and tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson. It offers in its dreamlike title track, written by pianist Duke Pearson, 14:52 minutes of the most serene instrumental romancing ever put on disc. The duration of the track came about by accident. Called just before midnight, 'Idle Moments' was the last tune to be recorded at the first session, and the playing times of the three tracks already in the can meant it had to be no longer than 7 minutes—anything over that would bust the maximum LP playing time of around 40 minutes.

But due to a misunderstanding, Green soloed for 64 rather than the planned 32 bars, and Pearson, Henderson and Hutcherson followed suit, each soloing for twice as long as had been expected. Fortunately, producer Alfred Lion had the ears and wit to keep the tape machine running.' This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf -youtube -application/pdf. 'Say the Brother's Name' by Pat Metheny I listened to this wonderful piece on 'I Can See Your House From Here' and found that there were a few typos in the Pat Metheny Songbook concerning the melodic rhythm. For example the melody at bars 1-3 of letter C was written in cut time in the songbook - in other words, the duration of the notes should be diminished by half as I've done here.

The drums and bass are played with a strong double time feel throughout the piece. The 16th note Latin feel strengthens for solos.

Happy new year everyone! Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Hank Mobley's 'My Groove, Your Move' Hey y'all! This track is from Mobley's 1960 release for Blue Note Records.

It's a mellow G minor blues with a peculiar form. The first round of the melody is 12 bars long and the second one 20 bars (12 bars + 8-bar tag). The solos are on a 12-bar minor blues form, similar to the first chorus of the melody. I scribbled down the melody of the tune, but I need some helping hand with the chords, especially from the 2nd ending onwards.

Listen to the tune here: All suggestions are welcome! 'I Have A Dream' by Herbie Hancock Here's the first track from Herbie Hancock's 'The Prisoner' (1969, Blue Note), which incorporates a number of horn instruments. I haven't identified the names of the instruments that play the melody in turns. Although the piece is written for a large ensembe I bet it would fix for a small jazz combo (e.g. Quartet) too. The names of the chords are somewhat simplified since the Herbie's arrangement is rich in harmonic movement.:-) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Una Mas (One More Time) by Kenny Dorham This bright bossa nova is the title piece from Kenny Dorham's album 'Una Mas (One More Time)' that was recorded in 1963 for Blue Note.

The tune has a slight resemblance to Lee Morgan's 'The Sidewinder' - the melodic rhythm at bars 1-2 of the head is indentical with each other. This is a condensed version of the recorded arrangement. The chart differs from the original recording in that once the tune has come to an end Kenny calls 'Una Mas' and the interlude is repeated 4 times before the final recapitulation of the head. I think the recap is unnecessary since it doesn't quite manage to uplift the lengthy arc of tension that has already been discharged (the eventual duration of the tune is 15:15). I'm not sure about the accuracy of the chart, so I'd like to hear you thoughts on it.

The tune didn't catch on in the jazz circles contrary to Dorham's another medium-fast bossa nova named 'Blue Bossa' that was released the same year in 1963 and became a common jazz standard. I haven't found a lead sheet of 'Una Mas' in any fake book around; does anyone know if it's published in any sheet music collection? Also, if anyone has a sheet music to the piece (or a chord chart or any other kind of document of the composition) I'd like to have a copy of that. Note: The earlier chart had some errors that I fixed. Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Lonnie's Lament by John Coltrane This tune was first released on John Coltrane's Crescent album in 1964. The melody and most of the chords are constructed from the C Dorian mode.

I've transcribed the piece from Kenny Garrett's 'Pursuance: The Music of John Coltrane' - it's a terrific recording! Garrett's arrangement deals with alternating 3/4, 5/4 and 4/4 passages. Note that the 5/4 time is broken down as 3/4 + 2/4, which makes the basic repeating rhythmic figure look like 3/4 + 3/4 + 2/4. In spite of the rather complex metric structure, the tune has a strong jazz waltz-like feel throughout.

Also, the continuous rhythmic pattern gives the mournful melody a nice boost. Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Dolphin Dance Excerpted from Speaking of Jazz: Essays and Attitudes Here’s a transcription of Herbie Hancock's Dolphin Dance, a unique piece which I performed with Herbie years ago in Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center, NYC.

Since the melody is widely known and basically correct, I'm only including the harmonic chord succession here—which is rather different from the normal lead sheets. As I've stated before, sophisticated original compositions such as this especially need to be verified through transcription, rather than trusting the Real Book and other unofficial sources. Since not everyone played exactly the same pitch collections in every chorus, I chose to make judgment calls and come up with an overall composite of what I thought was the general consensus. Some tunes are too special to entrust to unofficial sources. With a piece like this, I always try to start with the urtext, which is the original recording by the composer.

As with Wayne Shorter, Hancock knows exactly what he wants—and is special and sophisticated. In the case of standards, it's instead about signifying—two different types of story, with different intent. For example, I would never reharmonize Dolphin Dance, but I reharmonize and arrange many of the standards that I perform.

The key to improvising on this piece is in its strong melody. There are some non-functional guide tone lines of a sort, too—especially over the pedals, which remind me of Debussy's Nuages. I don't take the chords too seriously in terms of direction for improvising, however—only color and mood.

I love how the melody climaxes two-thirds through on the highest note of duration, a classic Golden Section. While all other melodic motives are well-developed, the climax motive only happens that once. It's a beautifully constructed work on all levels.

For me, the most noteworthy chord is the Ab7-5 blues chord in the momentary Cm, suggesting flat five blues phrases. ANALYSIS Dolphin Dance, a very sophisticated Impressionist-inspired Herbie Hancock piece, is one of the most complex jazz compositions written to date. Hancock was influenced by French Impressionist composers Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel, as the salient characteristics of this particular composition demonstrate. Since not everyone played exactly the same pitch collections in every chorus, I made judgment calls to derive a composite of what I thought was the general consensus. Although lush and mostly non-dissonant in nature, this is an atonal composition (no primary key). As with Debussy's and Ravel's atonal passages, Hancock includes brief tonal references with occasional ii V cadences; but none of those cadences (four in this piece) establish a key.

There are, instead, brief suggestions of keys in this non-functional chord succession (keys of: Eb, Cm, G, Cm, G, and F...?). As with the Impressionists, Herbie employs various pedal points over which he suspends a variety of successions containing unresolved melodic Ninths, Elevenths, and Thirteenths—a rich milieu. Hancock succeeds in achieving an extremely moody and subtle vehicle for his virtuoso, yet sensitive, piano style. Many professional jazz soloists fall flat on their asses attempting to improvise on this in public: It separates the men from the boys, since you really have to do your homework on this one, since your average jazz licks just don’t work. This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf.

The Sidewinder by Lee Morgan Here's a real book type transcription of Lee Morgan's Sidewinder from his Blue Note album of the same name. The tune was released in 1963 and it became a big hit and instant soul jazz classic. The piece has a rather peculiar 24-bar blues form, that is basically a conventional 12-bar blues whose each chord is extended by half (8+4+4+4+4=24).

The funky piano comp figure that is doubled by the horns in the melody has a relaxed Latin feel, but is played with swung eighth notes throughout. The chromatic vamp figure on Eb7 can be construed as Ebdim or Eb-6 (Gb and C) to Eb7 (G and Db). It is sometimes presented (e.g. In the Real Book vol. 1) as chromatic transfer from D7 to Eb7, but I prefer the earlier interpretation, which is backed up with Eb note in the bass. That chromatic ascending chordal figure (from Idim to I7) is a common blues riff that can be often found in blues tunes in varied inversions. I also included a sample drum part at the end of the chart.

The snare drum accents follow the piano comp rhythm at the first bar, but are played differently at the second bar. The ride cymbal plays a regular swing time throughout.

Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Little One by Herbie Hancock This one is from Herbie's classic Maiden Voyage album. The piece is constructed of rubato head and jazz waltz solo section. The Eb-7/F (F Phrygian) chord at 2nd bar of letter C is an alternate to Eb13/F chord; note that those chords are harmonically different from each other (I've gleaned a pile of transcriptions of the tune and included two different versions of the chord here). The rest of the parenthetic changes are alternative chord namings (e.g.

D-/E for E7susb9).:) Ville This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Peace Piece Excerpted from The Influence of Claude Debussy's and Maurice Ravel's Music on Jazz, as Seen in the Compositions of Bix Beiderbecke, Bill Evans and Miles Davis, by Ed Byrne Bill Evans’s “Peace Piece” Just prior to his association with Davis, Evans recorded an extemporaneous modal composition entitled “Peace Piece” for his LP Everybody Digs Bill Evans.

Recorded in December 1958, four months before Davis’s Kind of Blue, it is in Martin Williams’s opinion, “a remarkable ostinato tour de force, an improvisation as good as some of the carefully wrought French impressionistic [sic] compositions which in part inspired it” (35-36). In “Peace Piece,” many of the stylistic musical manifestations of Debussy and Ravel are apparent: modes and other scalar collections, pc transpositions, pc mixtures, and tonally nonfunctional chord successions. Bitonality, quartal harmony, parallelism, unresolved melodic and harmonic tensions, and pedal point also exist in this piece; and there is also a lack of resolution of the leading-tone in cadences. Based entirely on a double pedal point of C and G, “Peace Piece” is accompanied by two oscillating chords, CMA7 and G9 sus4(no 5), that together create a diatonic accompaniment comprised of a diatonic hexachord (C, E, F, G, A, B). Jim Aikin’s transcription, published in Contemporary Keyboard (46-49), will serve as the basis for my analysis of “Peace Piece” (Example 2). “Peace Piece” contains a variety of pcs and modes of the kind found in the music of Debussy and Ravel.

They all occur over the double pedal point, creating pc mixtures and a pc transposition in the process. The C ionian mode can be found in measures 1-43, 51-57 and 68-76.

C is established as the priority note through the C pedal that recurs throughout this piece. A pc comprised of F#, G, B, C#, D# and E# is sounded over the C diatonic accompaniment; and a pc collection comprised of Ab, A, B, Db, Eb, F and G appears in measures 48-49. A pentachord consisting of E, F#, G, A and C is played over the pedal in the first two beats of measure 50; and Evans plays a quintachord comprised of G, Ab, B, Eb and F in the second half of measure 50. Parallel non-functional chord successions can also be found in “Peace Piece.” Parallel ascending trichords (G, Eb, F#), (A, F, G#), (B, G, A#), for example, are apparent in measures 58-59. There is a tetrachord comprised of C, Db, D# and E in measure 60; and a quintachord consisting of F#, G, A, Bb and B appears in measure 62.

Evans plays a hexachord comprised of D#, E, G#, B, C and D in measures 64-65; and he plays a pc comprised of C, Eb, F, F# and G over the pedal point in measure 67. Built on an ostinato, the only passage in “Peace Piece” that resembles a cadence occurs in measure 75, where on beat four the fifth degree, G, is in the pedal point; but the leading-tone, B, is absent. Bitonalities appear in, or are at least suggested in “Peace Piece,” since all of the pcs mentioned above occur above the diatonic pedal point; and they are often chromatic in their relationship to it, and appear in discrete registers. Quartal and quintal intervals occur with frequency in “Peace Piece.” 7s and a 5 can be seen in measures 6-8. Evans plays parallel 7s in measures 20-23 and 30-35, and successive 5s are evident in measure 36; 5s and 7s appear in measures 54-56 and 70-76. Unresolved melodic tensions abound in “Peace Piece.” The initial melodic motive, which first appears in measures 6-13, contains several sustained ninths, D’s.

A major seventh tension, B, appears in measures 14-17. F#s create extended unresolved augmented elevenths at the end of measure 43 and in measure 44.

C#s create minor ninth tensions (spelled enharmonically) in measures 45-46, while the repeated A’s create major sixths. Since the two chords of the accompaniment are CMA7 and G9 sus4 (no 5), “Peace Piece” also contains unresolved harmonic tensions: a major seventh (B) on the CMA7 tetrachord, a sustained perfect fourth (F) and a major ninth (A) appear on a G9 sus4 (no 5) tetrachord. Analysis of “Peace Piece” demonstrates an extensive presence of the kinds of sounds heard in the music of Debussy and Ravel. Traditional chord progressions are non-existent. The constant presence of a pedal point comprised of two oscillating chords provides the listener with a reference point for the succession of pcs and pc transpositions and mixtures that take place.

Bitonality, parallelism, unresolved melodic and harmonic tensions, and the lack of resolution of the leading-tone in its cadence also supply this performance with interesting patterns of pitch organization. Evans’s extemporaneous performance of these Debussyan and Ravellian sounds endow this seven-minute piano solo with a resultant refreshing style that was unusual and surprising for its time. This post contains the following attachment types: -application/pdf. Ed's Solo w/ Chet Baker Hi Folks, Below is my paraphrase solo of There Will Never Be Another You with Chet Baker.

I was supposed to take two choruses, but, satisfied I said enough in one, stopped there. To give context to the evening, I'm including a short except from my new book, The Sublime and the Ridiculous: Tales from a Jazz Life, which I haven't released for fear of getting sued by so many... Carnegie Hall Concert When performing for a big star in front of a packed house of one of the most famous concert halls in the world, anything can—and often does—happen. Chet Baker got a call from Creed Taylor to do a major comeback concert and record a live double CD recording at New York City’s Carnegie Hall with fellow headliners Gerry Mulligan and Stan Getz, along with such luminary sidemen as Roland Hanna, Ron Carter, John Scofield, Harvey Mason, Dave Samuels and Bob James. When they got to the rehearsal at CTI Studios, they all fell out into bickering and other ego-induced unpleasantness. As a result of each star refusing to play together without also being able to do a set with his own band, I became Chet’s compromise addition to the play-list for the concert recording that would be released as Carnegie Hall Concert. Subsequently, when Chet and I rehearsed our best material with Bob James, Ron Carter, and Harvey Mason, everything wen.

String Quartet - Intermediate By Elton John. Arranged by Phyllis Avidan Louke, ASCAP. Broadway, Musicals, Movies, Pop, Wedding. Score, Set of Parts. Published by Louke Publishing (H0.1). Item Number: H0.1 Scored for String Quartet, this beautiful Elton John song from Walt Disney Pictures’ THE LION KING, translates wonderfully to strings.

The arrangement is faithful to the version sung by Elton John. Phyllis Avidan Louke is an award-winning composer and arranger with more than 50 published pieces to her credit. About SMP Press This product was created by a member of SMP Press, our global community of independent composers, arrangers, and songwriters. Our independent musicians have created unique compositions and arrangements for the Sheet Music Plus community, many of which are not available anywhere else. Click to see more titles from these independent creators and to learn more about SMP Press. Please note this product may not be eligible for all sales, promotions or coupons offered through Sheet Music Plus - please check promotional details for specifics. About Digital Downloads Digital Downloads are downloadable sheet music files that can be viewed directly on your computer, tablet or mobile device.

Once you download your digital sheet music, you can view and print it at home, school, or anywhere you want to make music, and you don’t have to be connected to the internet. Just purchase, download and play! PLEASE NOTE: Your Digital Download will have a watermark at the bottom of each page that will include your name, purchase date and number of copies purchased.

You are only authorized to print the number of copies that you have purchased. You may not digitally distribute or print more copies than purchased for use (i.e., you may not print or digitally distribute individual copies to friends or students).

String Quartet - Intermediate By Elton John. Arranged by Phyllis Avidan Louke, ASCAP. Broadway, Musicals, Movies, Pop, Wedding. Score, Set of Parts. Published by Louke Publishing (H0.1). Item Number: H0.1 Scored for String Quartet, this beautiful Elton John song from Walt Disney Pictures’ THE LION KING, translates wonderfully to strings. The arrangement is faithful to the version sung by Elton John.

Phyllis Avidan Louke is an award-winning composer and arranger with more than 50 published pieces to her credit. About SMP Press This product was created by a member of SMP Press, our global community of independent composers, arrangers, and songwriters.

Our independent musicians have created unique compositions and arrangements for the Sheet Music Plus community, many of which are not available anywhere else. Click to see more titles from these independent creators and to learn more about SMP Press.

Please note this product may not be eligible for all sales, promotions or coupons offered through Sheet Music Plus - please check promotional details for specifics. About Digital Downloads Digital Downloads are downloadable sheet music files that can be viewed directly on your computer, tablet or mobile device. Once you download your digital sheet music, you can view and print it at home, school, or anywhere you want to make music, and you don’t have to be connected to the internet. Just purchase, download and play! PLEASE NOTE: Your Digital Download will have a watermark at the bottom of each page that will include your name, purchase date and number of copies purchased. You are only authorized to print the number of copies that you have purchased. You may not digitally distribute or print more copies than purchased for use (i.e., you may not print or digitally distribute individual copies to friends or students).

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